AP Blog

By Greg Stock, 06/20/2019
As we begrudgingly make our way through the storm season, while casting a wary eye toward the 2019 hurricane season, this is a great time to review the hazards and coverage associated with these events to make sure you are adequately prepared. The U.S. has already experienced heavy rains, flooding, hail, and...
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By Robert Esposito, 06/17/2019
Truck side guards are devices designed to keep vehicles, pedestrians and bicyclists from being injured or killed by large trucks in side-impact collisions. Side guards have been required standard equipment since the 1980s in Europe and Japan, and more recently in Brazil. They are also widely adopted in China,...
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Preventing OSHA's Top 10 Citations
01/03/2017

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, more than 4,500 workers are killed on the job every year with the leading cause being falls. It is an employer’s responsibility to provide a safe workplace so the Occupational Safety and Health Administration publishes a list of their ten most frequently cited safety and health violations in hopes that employers will take the proper steps to correct these hazards:

  1. Fall Protection, 1926.501
  2. Hazard Communication, 1910.1200
  3. Scaffolds, 1926.451
  4. Respiratory Protection, 1910.134
  5. Lockout/Tagout, 1910.147
  6. Powered Industrial Trucks, 1910.178
  7. Ladders, 1926.1053
  8. Machine Guarding, 1910.212
  9. Electrical Wiring, 1910.305
  10. Electrical, General Requirements, 1910.303

While all of these violations can affect the senior living industry, hazard communication and lockout/tagout are the most likely infringements to occur. It is important to recognize the potential hazards in your community and provide appropriate employee education and safety training to mitigate your risk.  AssuredPartners’ senior living team can help you prepare for an OSHA inspection and even conduct a mock-audit to identify areas of concern.  To learn more about our risk management services, visit AssuredPartners Senior Living.

Source: U.S. Department of Labor